middleland:

Plan of an Ancient work on the west side of the Great Miami River, in Butler County, Ohio, three miles south west from the town of Hamilton situate on the south East quarter of Section No. 12, Town. 2, Range 2. by Christopher Busta-Peck on Flickr.
Via Flickr:A drawing (August 4, 1836) by James McBride. Used courtesy of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia (William Vaux Collection), on permanent loan to the Ohio Historical Society. Reproduced from Timeline, March-April, 1998.

middleland:

Plan of an Ancient work on the west side of the Great Miami River, in Butler County, Ohio, three miles south west from the town of Hamilton situate on the south East quarter of Section No. 12, Town. 2, Range 2. by Christopher Busta-Peck on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
A drawing (August 4, 1836) by James McBride.

Used courtesy of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia (William Vaux Collection), on permanent loan to the Ohio Historical Society.

Reproduced from Timeline, March-April, 1998.

Pannier


[pan-yer, -ee-er]
While cyclists knowpanniers as the useful bags that clip onto their bicycles, this is actually a relatively recent sense of this term. Pannier first entered English around 1300 from the Latinpanarium meaning “bread basket.” It originally referred to a basket used to carry items such as food, medical supplies, or other provisions, sometimes in a military context. Starting in the 1930s, people used the term pannier to refer to the bag fastened over a bicycle’s rear wheels. This sense is still used (and creatively pronounced) by English-speaking bike enthusiasts

Peloton


[pel-uh-ton, pel-uh-ton]
In terms of biking, apeloton is the main group of competitors moving forward together in a cycling race such as the Tour de France. When peloton first entered English around 1700, it referred to a small unit of soldiers.Peloton shares its root with the term platoon; they both come from the French meaning “small ball.” The cycling sense of peloton emerged in the 1930s, perhaps in conjunction with rising popularity and international news coverage of the Tour de France.

Penny-farthing

[pen-ee-fahr-thing]
In the late 1800s, bicycle speed was directly related to the size of the front wheel. It follows that during this time, front wheels became increasingly larger and larger until the penny-farthing, also known as the ordinary, entered the market in the 1870s. Thepenny-farthing got its name from the British currency of the time. It was thought that the large and small wheels next to each other resembled a penny next to the much smaller farthing. Luckily, by the end of the century, bicycle technology improved. Front wheels shrank, and bicycles became easier and safer to use.

Velocipede


[vuh-los-uh-peed]
The velocipede was an early version of the bicycle. Constructed from iron and wood, this form of transportation made for a bumpy enough ride to earn itself the nickname “boneshaker.”Velocipede entered English in the first half of the 19th century from the Latin velox + pedem, literally meaning “swift foot.” The term first referred to a dandy- or hobby-horse, a two-wheeled vehicle propelled by feet, however, by the 1850s, this sense evolved to mean the pedal-powered early bicycle.