penamerican:

"But I don’t want comfort. I want God, I want poetry, I want real danger, I want freedom, I want goodness. I want sin." - Brave New World
Aldous Huxley!

Fully flourishing humanity 

penamerican:

"But I don’t want comfort. I want God, I want poetry, I want real danger, I want freedom, I want goodness. I want sin." - Brave New World

Aldous Huxley!

Fully flourishing humanity 

"There are two general ways of using repetition. This first is to set up patterns that the reader will correctly anticipate. This is the method of traditionally metered verse. We correctly anticipate many of the various kinds of repetition found in a traditional sonnet. The second way is to surprise the reader with repetitions—rhyme where he or she doesn’t expect it, alliteration, unanticipated repetitions of stressed and unstressed syllables. This second method has become one of the major devices of free verse, and it is one of the major ways of manipulating surprise. Of course any poem may have dozens of repeating elements occurring in both predetermined and seemingly random positions. In free verse, however, the placing of those elements appear to be more unpredictable, which is not to say that it is arbitrary."
- Stephen Dobyns, from “Notes on Free Verse” in Best Words, Best Order: Essays on Poetry (St. Martin’s Griffin, 1997)
middleland:

Plan of an Ancient work on the west side of the Great Miami River, in Butler County, Ohio, three miles south west from the town of Hamilton situate on the south East quarter of Section No. 12, Town. 2, Range 2. by Christopher Busta-Peck on Flickr.
Via Flickr:A drawing (August 4, 1836) by James McBride. Used courtesy of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia (William Vaux Collection), on permanent loan to the Ohio Historical Society. Reproduced from Timeline, March-April, 1998.

middleland:

Plan of an Ancient work on the west side of the Great Miami River, in Butler County, Ohio, three miles south west from the town of Hamilton situate on the south East quarter of Section No. 12, Town. 2, Range 2. by Christopher Busta-Peck on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
A drawing (August 4, 1836) by James McBride.

Used courtesy of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia (William Vaux Collection), on permanent loan to the Ohio Historical Society.

Reproduced from Timeline, March-April, 1998.